What To Do With The Strawberry Tower?

My strawberries hate my strawberry tower. They literally run from it.

Last year in my book writing garden absence, I let them run as they wished as I was failing the time to reign them in. Subsequently, if you drive by my house this weekend you will see a sign at the end of the driveway that says this: “Free Strawberry Plants – You Dig”

Strawberry tower by rochelle greayer www.pithandvigor.comI have decided not to fight them on this tower issue anymore. Instead I am going to let them have some of the pathways that they insist on taking over. They seem to be ok with me walking over them on occasion and I appreciate that they are a pretty effective at choking out any other weed that might want to take hold. Plus there is the profusion of home grown strawberries.

But I am unsure of what to do with the tower. I have a few thoughts…the first is to fill it with a succulent garden. I think that would be a stunning focal point, but my reality is that I live in Massachusetts – not Southern California, and the selection of hardy succulents is limited – so much so that I that think this plan would likely turn out to be nothing more than a study in Hens and Chicks. The second is to fill it with herbs – an idea that I also love, but frankly – given the extreme amount of herbs I have planted throughout the rest of my garden – is something that I really don’t need. So I think my last idea – to fill it with a striking collection of annuals is where I am going to end up.

Yellow color study planting by rochelle greayer www.pithandvigor.comI am not so big on mixed containers and find that single plant containers are easier for me to manage.  Plus, I prefer a more modern look – but I think this is the place for an exception of sorts. The layers are calling out to me, they seem to be asking for a color study in ascending stripes. I am choosing yellow and plan to work a gradation from white to deep yellow over the five levels (I will let the strawberries have the bottom since it is what they insist).  I have a little worry that the nemesia will not like the position (being a shade lover) but this is a tricky sort of thing since one side gets way more sun than the other.  I am looking forward to seeing how this experiment works out over the season.

If you want to know more about each plant, here are the links to each choice: Diamond Frost EuphorbiaNemesia CoconutLantana Luscious LemonadeFlambe Yellow Chrysocephalum apiculatumGoldilocks Rocks Bidens hybrid.

If you want to read more about my strawberry tower, check out these posts.

Images:  Images courtesy of proven winners and rochelle greayer.

Disclosure: This post is sponsored by Proven Winners.  I am not an employee of Proven Winners and all opinions are my own. See the other posts in this series. 

 

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Blog Comments

Rochelle,

I would think the Nemesia could take full sun in your area, but I may think of MA as cooler than it actually is 🙂 They do fine in full sun for us (VA) in spring and early summer when night temps aren’t oppressive. Sunsatia White, Yellow, and Red had an overhaul a few years ago and they now do well for us in full sun in fall too. I suggest flip flopping the Chryso and Lantana as the Lant will want to be bigger. Thanks for a terrific blog 🙂

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