Can you Identify this Rose? | PITH + VIGOR by Rochelle Greayer

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Can you Identify this Rose?

6/16/2010

I am no rose Expert….I admit it fully.  So I need some help.  This rose is planted at the Clara Endicott Sears Garden that I am helping to restore.   Can you identify this rose?   I could really use the input.

unidentified rose from clara endicott sears garden

unidentified rose from clara endicott sears garden

Here’s what else I can tell you.  It doesn’t seem to be a climber.  It is little and dainty (only a couple feet tall) but it has been fighting overgrowth for many years.  The flowers are not huge either….about 2.5 – 3 inches across and it smells amazing.

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  1. Shellene says:

    Hi,

    I have two areas in my garden where a VERY similar rose has appeared out of no where, or actually in an area where I had a completely different rose. I am led to believe that this is a root stock used for hybridizing roses …maybe? The second area this rose is coming up, or shall I say coming out of is my is my Heavens Gate Rose. Like you I am not a rose expert, but it is interesting .

  2. Laurie Brown says:

    See if anyone around there knows if it reblooms. The leaves and the roundness of the buds make me think it might be an old European rose, although the pointedness of the buds points to some crossing with the Oriental roses. What is the shape of the shrub? Is it vase shaped, or more wayward?

  3. Rachel says:

    Can you describe the scent? also, find out if blooms once or more than once. what form is it? is it shrubby, does it climb? from the pic it looks a bit on the side of purple rather than red. also can you get a better pic of the whole plant? and the leaves?

    I am guessing an old garden rose. maybe a bourbon. send me more pics and a description of the scent and maybe I could get closer.

  4. Louise says:

    As above, it does remind me of a bourbon rose- perhaps the thornless ‘Zephrine Drouhin’? Zephrine is known to get up to 10′ but if in challenging conditions may only put on a couple feet growth. Key for id is thornless, tho.
    Sounds like an interesting project.

  5. rochelle says:

    thanks guys for your help.

    here is some more info — it is about 2′ tall and is basically single stemmed – when I was digging some of it yesterday for transplant, it seemed to have a running root that had single, largely unbranched stems coming off. It definitely has thorns. I am not sure how to describe the scent…you might need to help me with this one. It smells like a great smelling rose to me….
    Not sure yet if it blooms again…will have to wait and see….it’s first (and perhaps only?) flush of blooms seem to be fading right now. Rachel — it is definitely purple and not red. I took a pic of a fading bloom yesterday and will send that to you as soon as I offload it from my camera — I seem to have misplaced the cable in the my unpacking from my trip….

  6. Lauren says:

    Could it be a newer rose? Your description makes me think of Rosa ‘Intrigue’ but it was hybridized in 1981 and has much glossier foliage. Maybe a parent of that?

    • rochelle says:

      Clara died in 1960 — so the entire garden was planted before then….so I think it probably isn’t something that was hybridized in 1981…definitely older

  7. Gary says:

    My guess would be Rose ‘de Resht’ which is a damask rose. Very fragrant indeed and quite a tough suckering shrub. Mine in Pennsylvania has been in bloom since May 1st.

  8. Sharlyn Curtis says:

    I agree with Gary that you have ‘Rose de Rescht’ Damask rose. It is thought to have originated in Persia or France during the Roman Empire, and rediscovered in an English garden in 1940.. This fuchsia 3 foot little darling has that wonderful “old rose” fragrance that legands are written. Rose de Rescht is a repeat bloomer in very distinct cycles of 6 weeks. This rose is one of my favorites!

  9. India Tour says:

    Also that single flowers can be shot in another environment as a garden: above my hawaii-orchids with a winterly landscape from Karlsruhe in the background.

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