Rochelle Greayer

Welcome to the

Pith   Vigor

blog

+

The Shop

dig into

PSSST... Back Issues of P+V Newspaper Are Available in the FREE Resource Library

the Book

buy

CONNECT:

Hey There! I’m Rochelle Greayer. I’m a garden designer on TV and IRL. I’m also an author and entrepreneur who thinks she can save the world by teaching everyone a little something about landscape design.

rochelle

meet

JOin US for bootcamp

TELL ME MORE

10/28/2009

Living Ocotillo Fences – Fouquieria splendens

ocotillo cactus closeup

by Walks On Rocks

I am fascinated with a recent discovery.   In the desert southwest the Ocotillo Cactus (Fouquieria splendens) is harvested to create living fences and other garden features.  It is a material that is exciting in that it is unique to the region where it is used and it really gives a sense of the place.

ocotillo cactus in the borrego badlands

by Walks On Rocks

Like many cactus, the plant comes alive, in a sense, when water is available.  While the stems can look dead – even thought they are not, when dormant, it is amazing to me that when they leaf out, the leaves almost look like boxwood.

2338739089_768ee5abfb

Poppies with ocotillo fence in the background by alicia_d_lars

Ocotillo cactus is harvested and used in garden construction. Rancho Lobos is a producer of ocotillo fencing and this is how they describe the product:

These shrubs have been used by rural communities for ages in the construction of fences, ramadas and ceiling decorations. With the distinct feature that, when used for fencing, the ocotillo stems are buried about 4 to 6 inches into the ground, allowing them to root, providing a living fence that can grow up to 20 feet tall. For commercial purposes the stems are cut 2 to 3 feet from the base, choosing diameters between 3/4 to 2 inches, considered to be mature stems. They present little to no spines, except for the top part of the stem, which is trimmed to provide segments as uniform as possible 6 feet tall. Then they are woven together with a thin galvanized wire (cal. 18) to hold them together and allow growth. Making fence sections 5 feet long that can be easily rolled for transportation.

ocotillo corral fence vinewood

by Schooksonruss

This old corral fence was made from Ocotillo Cactus sticks.  The sticks are also called Candlewood, Slimwood, Coachwood and Vine Cactus.

3671463506_847bb6a2de

by fucher is now

In a way, I think it is similar to willow.  I am wondering if there are other locally known plants that can, in this way, be used to create a natural barrier or fence.  Do you know of any?

Spread the love
  • 8
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    8
    Shares
  1. Ryan

    October 29th, 2009 at 3:44 am

    Wow!

    That is one fence that would really take off here, if only it would survive!

    The thorns would make it a great option to increase security and the fact that you can just cut and plant makes it incredibly easy to use! Very much like Williow indeed!

    How fantastic. Thanks for sharing!

    Ryan

  2. Susan aka Miss R

    October 29th, 2009 at 11:39 am

    What about a Belgian fence? A traditional espalier technique of weaving plants together for in a hatch pattern… http://www.finegardening.com/CMS/uploadedImages/Images/Gardening/Issues_61-70/041070055-01_med.jpg

  3. Suzanna

    December 10th, 2009 at 10:23 pm

    Note, that these cacti only have no spines when they are about 2″ in diameter, until then then they are spined BEASTS. Very intimidating in the winter landscape.

  4. mike millican

    March 10th, 2010 at 10:52 pm

    im not tryin to be too critical but i dont believe ocatillo is a cactus. MM

  5. Les

    April 10th, 2011 at 1:30 pm

    Ocatillo is a succulent; easily mistaken for a cactus.

  6. Jennifer Polakis

    March 17th, 2016 at 2:40 am

    Ocotillos are actually trees/bushes.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Join the PitH+VIGOR Newsletter Community