Split and Snake Rail Fence Inspiration | PITH + VIGOR by Rochelle Greayer

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Split and Snake Rail Fence Inspiration

2/17/2010

We are replacing our (now smashed due to last week’s tree removal) cheap metal rail garden fence with a much more attractive split rail fence.   I have been considering the differences (both cost and aesthetic) of split rails verses snake rails.

In the mean time, I have been perusing pretty pictures of the look to help me plan.
snake rail and split rail garden fence inspiration

1. Rail fence & wild flowers, 2. Split Rail Fence, 3. Sugar maple tree by a split-rail fence in rural Vermont, United States, 4. YEE_0754, 5. Split Rail Fence, 6. Cedar split rail fence, 7. Snake Split Rail Fence, 8. “Gated Community”

Snake rails are generally about 10′ long but you get around 7′ of distance out of them because their stability comes from the stacked wood interlocking and propping up against itself.  They are, in my opinion, the way to go if you are trying to achieve or maintain a particular historic look.  My fence will go around the existing but expanding vegetable garden, and the garden is already laid out on a grid, so having these snaking sides isn’t going to work for me.  I have decided that we will go with an 11′ spaced,  2 rail fence and we are going to order if from American Timber and Steel. It is yellow pine treated with ACQ making it have a considerably longer life than cedar (2X-3x longer and it is cheaper).  It also has sides that are precut to make attaching chicken wire (as I will be doing) easier and more attractive.  I was quite unsure of the ACQ treatment at first, but have done some research and I think I am ok with it.  Have you used ACQ treated wood?  What is your experience?  The order hasn’t been placed so I am eager to hear your opinion.

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