Rochelle Greayer

Welcome to the

Pith   Vigor

blog

+

The Shop

dig into

PSSST... Back Issues of P+V Newspaper Are Available in the FREE Resource Library

the Book

buy

CONNECT:

Hey There! I’m Rochelle Greayer. I’m a garden designer on TV and IRL. I’m also an author and entrepreneur who thinks she can save the world by teaching everyone a little something about landscape design.

rochelle

meet

JOin US for bootcamp

TELL ME MORE

2/14/2009

Beautiful Bocce Court

I wanted to make a quick post about an article I read some time ago in This Old House Magazine.  It is available online and it is one of the best articles I have seen about creating a great outdoor play area that is appropriate for all ages.  The design is excellent but the article also (helpfully) goes into great detail about the construction.

From the Article:

Working from a design by landscape architect Elliott Brundage, This Old House landscape contractor Roger Cook took one backyard, overgrown with bittersweet and poison ivy, and turned it into a sports lovers’ heaven, squeezing in a croquet lawn, a horseshoe pit, and a bocce court.

If you are planning anything like this, it is worth checking into.

Bocce court in the garden design by elliott brundage this old house magazine

Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  1. Michelle Derviss

    February 14th, 2009 at 7:29 pm

    Nice looking bocce ball court.
    The green top dressing looks a little out of the norm though.
    Traditionally we use oyster shell powder and crushed oyster shell as a top coat and finish coat which leaves the playing surface smooth ( no ball tracks ) and white.

    I like this author’s idea about using Trex type recycled wood as the interior back bounce surface.
    I’ve been using redwood for years and after about 10- 15 years or so of heavy use it needs to be repaired due to all the dings and subsequent cracks.

    Thanks for the link to the article.

  2. MsB

    April 16th, 2009 at 3:58 pm

    Great Looking bocce court. On the east coast we normally use stone dust. Oyster shells are not readily available.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Join the PitH+VIGOR Newsletter Community