Rochelle Greayer

Welcome to the

Pith   Vigor

blog

+

The Shop

dig into

PSSST... Back Issues of P+V Newspaper Are Available in the FREE Resource Library

the Book

buy

CONNECT:

Hey There! I’m Rochelle Greayer. I’m a garden designer on TV and IRL. I’m also an author and entrepreneur who thinks she can save the world by teaching everyone a little something about landscape design.

rochelle

meet

JOin US for bootcamp

TELL ME MORE

1/27/2010

Blog of the Week: Fennel & Fern

I am about to lose countless happy hours to my new favorite blog.  It is called Fennel and Fern and it an amazing collection of posts from some of my favorite garden bloggers.  It is written by a gaggle of of writers and designers, but was founded by Isabel Eyre.  Her helpers, Debbie of Carrots and Kids, Chris and Harald of vegalicious, Kathy, Sarah, Ryan of Ryan’s Garden, and Susan pitch in to cover everything from rare plants to recipes to gardening with children.  It is really a great mix and makes for an exciting blog after my own heart.

apples and grass by fennel and fern isabel Isabel Eyre

Isabel is a fan of the inspiration board too and I am really enjoying this potager (Kitchen) garden and the “raffish” garden below.

potager garden kitchen garden inspiration board

Image credits, from left to right: Martine at http://www.banlieusardises.com/; Oscar de la Renta’s vegetable garden, by Richard Felber at Domino Magazine; cat among nasturtiums by Microsoft; artichoke by Karen; Dorset Cereals Edible Playground Garden at Chelsea 2008, courtesy of the RHS; Oscar de la Renta’s garden, as above; potager design by Michelle; forcing pots in West Dean kitchen garden by Andrew; potager design courtesy of Country Living; Oscar de la Renta’s garden as above; designs for Oscar de la Renta’s garden, as above; Gardens of Plenty by Marylyn Abbott; Potager design by Sylvie Guillem; Marigolds and dahlias in potager at Growing appetite; Rural garden by Moser’s Maroon; potager by Noisy Sound.

Coincidentally, when I found Fennel and Fern I noticed the terracotta rhubarb forcers in the above board….I have been researching rhubarb since last year; my own installation of three plants is, I think, probably not going to make it through the winter.  I love the stuff and dream of having it grow wildly out of control as my mother did when I was a kid, so I need to sort out what went wrong…my research introduced me to rhubarb forcers – though not probably the answer to my problem, I am wondering why I cant find a US based outlet for these lovely garden implements?hmmm…. And – any rhubarb tips would happily be appreciated.

quirky garden raffish garden from fennel and fern inspiration board garden

From top right to left: Scarecrow by RaffaeLLa; Swing by Gordana; Willow house by J. Tuason; Treehouse by Heather; Yves Piaget rose bouquet from Moraglia Flowers; Pansies in vintage teacup by Kelley; Blackboard and pansies in Gayla Trail’s roof garden, from YouGrowGirl; Bunting from The Big Beautiful Bunting Company; Living willow tunnel by Paul; Spiders web table and chairs, as seen on Primrose Hill, London by Lesley; Hanging lanterns from Blomma Flicka Flowers by Chris Carson; Bowl of hellebores by Rosie; Willow tunnel hung with gourds, by Rachael; Beehive lantern from The Renovation Store; Picnic scene from Petersham Nurseries by Lisa Barber; Pimms table setting from Brides; Table setting and parasol from Country Living; Strawberries by Plastic Design. Both Boards compiled by Isabel Eyre.
This is my new regular read for garden inspiration from England, it makes me feel a little like I live there again.  (sigh) Care to join me over there?…I am going to be a while….

Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  1. Louise

    January 28th, 2010 at 3:15 pm

    charming inspiration boards, rochelle, thanks for sharing those.
    About rhubarb…My long experience with both maintaining an old patch and starting new ones in zone 5 (central Mass) is this: Easy, easy breezy! Well composted material from your compost pile- mixed into yard topsoil- place in the corms 6-8″ down. stand back. If you planted them in a dry spring you will want to water 1″ a week for a few weeks- but usually our regular rainfall will do the trick.
    Of course they disappear in the winter and wont pop their new growth up til the frost is out of the soil. Mine are in part shade, maybe they would b less spindly with more sun- but still very productive.
    good luck!

  2. Louise

    January 28th, 2010 at 3:19 pm

    charming inspiration boards, rochelle, thanks for sharing those.
    About rhubarb…My long experience with both maintaining an old patch and starting new ones in zone 5 (central Mass) is this: Easy, easy breezy! Well composted material from your compost pile- mixed into yard topsoil- place in the corms 6-8″ down. (crown bud will be a couple inches below surface) stand back. If you planted them in a dry spring you will want to water 1″ a week for a few weeks- but usually our regular rainfall will do the trick.
    Of course they disappear in the winter and wont pop their new growth up til the frost is out of the soil. Mine are in part shade, maybe they would b less spindly with more sun- but still very productive.
    good luck!

  3. MrSkill

    August 11th, 2010 at 10:54 pm

    Hi! I have been searching for the Internet to find Inspiration for my job, I found great Ideas In your website, Thank you, Good luck to you and your upcoming endeavors.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Join the PitH+VIGOR Newsletter Community